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Healthy Gut Microbiome – Key to Overall Well-being

Healthy Gut Microbiome – Key to Overall Well-being

Gut health is linked to almost all aspects of human physical and mental well-being.  Research is gradually unfolding the link between an imbalance in the gut microbiome and the cascading effect leading to various diseases. Most of these bacteria live in a part of the large intestine called the cecum.

Here are the 5 reasons to have a Healthy Gut Microbiome

1. Nutrition: A healthy gut microbiome not only helps in better digestion and absorption of nutrients from the food we eat, but they also produce certain vitamins and a chemical called short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) which humans cannot produce (digesting fiber). This SCFA is beneficial for gut health and prevents many diseases.The gut microbiome is the largest endocrine organ, producing at least 30 hormone-like compounds.

2. Diseases:Recent findings shows that gut health is linked to many chronic diseases like metabolic diseases, gastrointestinal diseases, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and even neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease.

3. Immunity: The gut microbiome interacts with immune cells and impacts how the body responds to infections, even lung immunity is affected.  Imbalances in gut bacteria can negatively impact the immune system response and lead to inflammatory skin conditions and other autoimmune disorders.

4. Body weight: Evidence suggests that the gut microbiome plays an important role in the absorption, storage, and expenditure of energy obtained from the diet. An imbalance in gut bacteria also called Gut dysbiosis may lead to weight gain. Studies show that Gut microbiota differed in lean and obese individuals. The ratio of two types of bacteria in your intestines may determine how much weight you lose in response to a particular diet.

5. Mental health: Millions of nerves connect the Gut and Brain. Certain species of bacteria produce chemicals in the brain called neurotransmitters; they can impact social interaction and stress management. Serotonin is an antidepressant made in the gut. Gut microbes may play a role in understanding disorders like autism. In turn, a variety of external (high temperature) and internal stresses (examination stress, emotional stress etc) can impair normal intestinal microflora.

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